Article #16 Black Out: America’s Aging Power Supply Explained

America’s electrical grid is aging more an more with each passing year and needs to be replaced. Much of the electrical infrastructure of the United States was installed din the 1960’s and earlier.

As past majour blackouts have illustrated losing power in a large are can be quite significant. What do you think would happen to the US if a quarter of the country without power for a month or longer?

The short answer is there would be extensive looting and rioting, the economy would collapse, the transportation of goods would slow to a halt, people would start freezing, gas stations would run out of gas, and the American government would lose control over their country until power was restored.

Massive electrical grid failures have occurred numerous time sin history, most of which have been fixed rather quickly. For example the outages in

These events should show the US government that they cannot afford to allow similar outages to happen. The electric la grid severely needs repair and replacement and not in 20 years, it needs it as soon as possible.

http://www.hitachi.com/rev/pdf/2016/r2016_04_104.pdf

http://www.harriswilliams.com/sites/default/files/industry_reports/ep_td_white_paper_06_10_14_final.pdf

http://assets.climatecentral.org/pdfs/PowerOutages.pdf

The 10 worst blackouts of the last 50 years

These large power transformers around the world and in the US are often in need of repair and replacement. Unfortunately, this may seem obvious but doesn’t always occur in a timely and costly manner. (Photo Credit: via Unsplash)

 

This 2008 map of the US Power Grid is complex, yet many of the lines are severely lacking newer technology and have trouble supporting such a large population. (Photo Credit:Author Unknown via Wikimedia Commons )
The severity of America’s North Eastern seaboard blackout which occured during August 2003 is illustrated in this simple animation. in August 2003 (Animation Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) via Wikimedia Commons)